Lightroom’s Hidden Gems #3

Lightroom’s Hidden Gems #3

From keyboard shortcuts to menu items, there is a lot of Lightroom’s hidden gems we miss while organizing and enhancing our images. In this series, I’ll introduce you to (or remind you of) time saving shortcuts, enhancement techniques, and many of the lesser known, but really cool features in Lightroom.

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Lightroom’s Hidden Gems #2

From keyboard shortcuts to menu items, there is a lot of Lightroom’s hidden gems we miss while organizing and enhancing our images. In this new series, I’ll introduce you to (or remind you of) time saving shortcuts, enhancement techniques, and many of the lesser known, but really cool features in Lightroom.

Time Saving Menu Items

When teaching Lightroom, many instructors emphasize the speed of keyboard shortcuts.  I love keyboard shortcuts myself, but if you don’t even know the command exists, they won’t do you much good.  That’s where the menus come in handy. You, know, those old words scrawled across the top of your screen when Lightroom is open!  In the screen shot below, I’ve clicked on the Menu Item Lightroom to reveal the options in the drop down menu.

Get to know your shortcuts

If you’re like me, after clicking on a menu item you quickly scan the drop down ignoring the options while searching for your choice. This rapid reading prohibits us from absorbing the different selections available to us.  After years of using Lightroom, I still come across options I’ve never noticed before. Do yourself a favor. When searching through the menu items, take some time to read the options.  You’ll likely discover many of Lightroom’s hidden gems.

For example:  Under the help menu is the option to show Shortcuts.  If you are in the Library Module the option will be Library Module Shortcuts.  If you are in the Develop Module, it will read Develop Module Shortcuts.

Click on this option to reveal the following screen:

The shortcut treasure trove!  On the left the keyboard shortcut, on the right the command it invokes.  Simply click anywhere in this screen to make it disappear and return to the task at hand.  Remember, not all shortcuts are the same across the different Modules.  Pressing X while in the Library Module has a different effect then pressing X in the Develop Module.

Rename your photos

Another example is renaming your photos.  You won’t find a rename button in the interface, but by clicking on the Menu Item Library, you’ll see you can rename your photos by tapping the F2 key.

 

Selecting images quickly

Hidden in the Edit Menu, there’s a real time saver for selecting images.  Lets say you’ve just keyworded or labeled a group of selected images (as seen below).

Next you want to perform another action but on all of the images that are unselected. Simply go up to Edit>Invert Selection.

 

This will now inverse the selection and allow you to work on the remainder of the images.

Correct your cameras time stamp

Ever take pictures abroad (or just in the next time zone) and notice that your capture time is off?  This is because your camera still thinks it’s at home.  Easy to fix.  Simply select all of the images and choose Metadata>Edit Capture Time.

The resulting box allows you to change the capture time in several ways.  Here I am changing it to reflect an 8 hour time difference.

When you are in rush, stopping to read the menus is a real drag. So carve out a little time for some Lighroom exploration. You may just find that one command that makes it all worthwhile.

For more information on Lightroom, view our 33 part, 5 hour training tutorial!

Lightroom’s Hidden Gems

From keyboard shortcuts to menu items, there is a lot of Lightroom’s hidden gems we miss while organizing and enhancing our images. In this new series, I’ll introduce you to (or remind you of) time saving shortcuts, enhancement techniques, and many of the lesser known, but really cool features in Lightroom.

Read More

HDR and Focus Stacking

HDR and Focus Stacking

Sometimes it’s just impossible to capture the scene with just one exposure.  You may have to take multiple exposures to create an HDR blend to overcome the high contrast in the scene.  In other situations you may have to change focus in between shots to achieve maximum depth of field.  Whatever the case, there are situations that require more than one exposure. Back in July I wrote a post on “Focus Stacking to Control Depth of Field”.  In that post I showed you how to capture the exposures out in the field and how to process the images afterwards using Adobe Photoshop.  In books that I have written and videos I’ve recorded  I’ve also demonstrated how to both capture and process images to conquer high contrast situations using the HDR process.  What happens, however when you need to do both HDR and Focus Stacking  in the same scene?  Follow along with the video below to discover how one scene can be transformed when you shoot and process a series of exposures for HDR and a series for Focusing Stacking!

 

Creating Compelling B&W Imagery

Creating Compelling B&W Imagery

 

I love Black and White Photography.  It has a sense of gravity, timelessness and an inherent elasticity that allows a believable stretching of reality.  Creating compelling B&W imagery used to be a lengthy drawn out process.  Precise calculations, chemical solutions, paper choices and lots of time in the dark were the norm.  The digital age, however, has ushered in a multitude of methods for effortlessly creating powerful Black & White images.

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Making Better Photographs

Making Better Photographs

Better Photographs are made by YOU

If you’ve ever been shooting in the field with a good instructor, you’ve probably heard them ask “why are you making this photograph”. This question begs an answer more substantial than a simple description of what’s in front of your camera.  Answering is a good way to get you thinking more about the intention of the image rather than just the subject matter.  Capturing your intention is the key to making better photographs.

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